BreezyUpgradeNotes

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 0. Prevent the upgrade from replacing your Sun or IBM Java with GIJ:{{{wget http://homepage.mac.com/danielg4/java1-runtime-local_1.0_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i java1-runtime-local_1.0_all.deb}}}
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The sectioning makes it look like if you use Synaptic and the Breezy CD to do the upgrade, you don't have to edit /etc/apt/sources.list, but in fact you do (or at least I had to).

Pre-Upgrade

  1. Resolve any conflicting packages. Conflicting packages could possibly stop the upgrade, even at a very inconvenient stage. For a common example, if you have the packages mozilla-firefox and firefox installed, you should perform the following:{{{sudo apt-get remove firefox mozilla-firefox

sudo apt-get install mozilla-firefox}}}

  1. It is recommended that you have the "ubuntu-desktop", "kubuntu-desktop", or "edubuntu-desktop" metapackage (depending on which distribution you're running exactly) in order to ensure that you have the full set of default packages. Note that without these metapackages it is much more likely that you will encounter problems during the upgrade. Ed/k/ubuntu relies on the respective package to perform the successful upgrade.

    sudo apt-get install ubuntu-base ubuntu-desktop
  2. Prevent the upgrade from replacing your Sun or IBM Java with GIJ:{{{wget http://homepage.mac.com/danielg4/java1-runtime-local_1.0_all.deb

sudo dpkg -i java1-runtime-local_1.0_all.deb}}}

To Upgrade

With Breezy CD and Synaptic

  1. Open up Synaptic Package Manager
  2. Click on "Edit/Add CD-ROM"
  3. Click on "Mark All Upgrades"
  4. Click on "Apply"
  5. See the additional notes below
  6. Note that you need to add the cdrom again with Synaptic "Edit/Add CD-ROM" after the first reboot,this is needed because of new package authentication feature

Through Synaptic Package Manager

  1. Open up Synaptic Package Manager
  2. Change your repositories to look for Breezy
    • From

               URI: http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/
               Distribution: hoary
               Sections: main restricted

      To

               URI: http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/
               Distribution: breezy
               Sections: main restricted
  3. Click on "Reload"
  4. Click on "Mark All Upgrades"
  5. Click on "Apply"

Apt-Get

  1. Open up a terminal
  2. sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list
  3. Replace with the following:

## Major bug fix updates produced after the final release of the
## distribution.
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy-updates main restricted
deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy-updates main restricted

## Uncomment the following two lines to add software from the 'universe'
## repository.
## N.B. software from this repository is ENTIRELY UNSUPPORTED by the Ubuntu
## team, and may not be under a free licence. Please satisfy yourself as to
## your rights to use the software. Also, please note that software in
## universe WILL NOT receive any review or updates from the Ubuntu security
## team.
deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy main universe multiverse restricted
deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy main universe multiverse restricted

deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy-security main restricted
deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy-security main restricted

deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy-security universe
deb-src http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy-security universe
  1. sudo apt-get update
  2. sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Note: if you're not going to compile Ubuntu packages yourself, you may comment out the lines beginning with deb-src. If you don't know what that means, this applies to you. Smile :) Comment out a line by adding at least one # character at the beginning of the line, as in the example above. Typically, two #'s are used for a textual comment, and one # is used to disable a source.

Post-Upgrade

  1. If not running NFS as either client or server, remove portmap, as it's no longer needed:

    sudo apt-get --purge remove portmap
  2. If you are without some localisations, you may find that it is necessary to install language-pack-xx, language-pack-xx-base and language-support-xx (where xx = your language code).
  3. Start "update-notifier" and save your gnome-session if you want update notification automatically
  4. Check your /etc/X11/xorg.conf settings
    • If you have manually edited your /etc/X11/xorg.conf file, check for these lines:
      FontPath        "/usr/lib/X11/fonts/misc"
      The location of the fonts have changed, change all occurences of that into
      FontPath        "/usr/share/X11/fonts/misc"
      Do this for all the other lines as well, but be sure to keep the ending of the lines the same! so a line ending with 100dpi/:unscaled should still end with that, only change the 'lib' to 'share' in the configuration file
  5. Reboot in order to effect all changes (XFree86 to X.org, kernel upgrade, etc.)

Mirror servers

The bandwidth of the main Ubuntu server is not infinite. If you have a very low transfer rate, it is advisable for you to use a mirror. You can find a list of mirrors at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Archive (this list hasn't been reviewed for a long time and some of these servers may be down). It was made for warty, but notice that these servers are regularly synced with the main server, so you will find breezy packages there as well. Try to find a server which is located somewhere in your country or somewhere close to you.

You will probably ask how to use a mirror instead of the main Ubuntu repository. It's quite simple. First find a server suitable for you (e.g.choose one from here https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Archive). I will use a German mirror as an example - http://debian.charite.de/ubuntu/.

  1. Open up a terminal
  2. sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list
  3. and now modify the address of the server. if you used the default settings shown above you will see

deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy main universe multiverse restricted
deb-src http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu breezy main universe multiverse restricted
  • just change it to

deb http://debian.charite.de/ubuntu/ breezy main universe multiverse restricted
deb-src http://debian.charite.de/ubuntu/ breezy main universe multiverse restricted
  1. sudo apt-get update
  2. and you're ready to go

Comments

Comments for this upgrade

  1. NDISWrapper would not load as a kernel module after my upgrade. I kept getting the error: FATAL: Error inserting ndiswrapper (/lib/modules/2.6.12-9-686-smp/kernel/drivers/net/ndiswrapper/ndiswrapper.ko): Operation not permitted. To get NDISWrapper to work correctly, I had to do the following:

     1. Uninstall the current driver. Use ''ndiswrapper -l'' to get the name of the loaded driver,
        then ''ndiswrapper -e NAME'' to remove the currently installed driver.
     2. Reinstall the driver with the comment ''ndiswrapper -i DRIVER.inf'' using your windows driver.
     3. You should now be able to ''modprobe ndiswrapper'' successfully.


My upgrade has completely killed X, probably because of the nvidia drivers I had installed.

  • Details, please.

adam mcgreggor, 20051015 — if it's anything like my borkenness (also with a Nvida gpu), gdm will Just Not Launch, even after {{{dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg }}}

In my case, X fails to load, throwing up a generic 'probably malconfigured' notice, and then hanging, leaving me to

BreezyUpgradeNotes (last edited 2008-08-06 17:00:49 by localhost)