Advocacy

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==== Name (blank of they want to be anonymous) ==== ==== Name Charlie Kravetz (charlie-tca) ====
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Since I have vision issues, and lose my vision on a recurring basis, I have always had an interest in Accessibility. When Penelope Stowe announced that the Accessibility Team was being revived, I attended the meeting in April 2010. During that first meeting, I learned that the group would need people speaking out about the ability of all users to use Ubuntu.
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I have Multiple Scerosis and Osteoporosis. I lose most of my vision in recurring cycles. I have a difficult time with low contrast and small print. I can not program nor package applications for Ubuntu. When I was told I could help with Accessibility, it seemed like a perfect fit. I find IRC is a great equalizer. We all are equal there, regardless of our ability.
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Being an avid reader, I follow most things in print. Since so much of the information on the internet is in formats I cannot focus, I tend to look for the actual printed formats to read. I read everything on the Ubuntu wiki when I started using Ubuntu. Nothing looked real promising for someone who could not read online easily, and could not always use both hands like other people.
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The help wiki had a lot of information, but not really so much when it was actually needed. Asking on IRC in the support channels, one quickly learns that usable contrast, high visibility fonts, colors that show up well instead of look good, and basic support are mostly considered as not needed. Even bug triagers will look at usablity for the majority of users as more important than accessibility for all users.

Wiki pages are much more useful for me when I can print them in the same font-size I use to view them. Unfortunately, many times, the font I view them at is much larger than what prints. Also, many times, the pages are formatted using frames, and will not fully print. In those cases, I must copy the text to my own computer, pasting into an editor such as gedit or AbiWord. I can then resize the fonts and print the full text so I can read it.
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My resources were paying attention to Ubuntu User Days, the wiki, and UDS. Being quite enthusiatic, it seems pretty easy to tell people about Ubuntu and Accessibility. Of course, it helps that I feel so strongly about the subject, too. Having the support of the community really helps.
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We need to constantly insure that the wiki pages are usable by everyone, not just the majority of users. We also need to repeat often, using various wordings, since not everyone hears the same thing. We have a huge community already, but there is always room for growth. It takes an average of 17 times for the normal person to remember what they heard. That means if something is said one time, there is an excellent chance it is not remembered. We must always remember we can not force anyone to do what they do not want to. We have to strive instead to educate.

September 2010 Community Report : Advocacy

<-- Back to the main Community Report page

This report is being put together by: Laura Czajkowski

This report is here to satisfy the following use case:

Sam loves Ubuntu so much that he/she wants to tell the world about it. But how and where?

The goal of this assessment to identify what typical experience Sam may have and areas in which it can be approved.

Assessment Process

To perform this assessment we would like to ask those involved to perform the following steps:

  1. First put yourself in the position of Sam who has no idea how to participate within this area. How does find out about to participate, where our resources are, which communication channels they can use etc? Please enter your findings into the Discoverability section below.

  2. How does Sam learn the skills to participate in this area? Enter your findings in the Learnability' section below.

  3. How does Sam know what to work on and how to contribute? Enter your findings in the Doability section below.

  4. Find five community members who are very new to the community and ask them to answer the questions in the New Community Member Feedback section below.

  5. Finally, review all the findings you have notes down here and propose a set of improvements that are concrete things we can work on. Note these in the Recommendations For Improvement section below.

Findings

To ensure our work is as useful as possible, please ensure that all findings are factual and not based on opinion and perception, and where possible, backed up with links to resources that outline the findings.

Discoverability

Items to consider:

  • How do new community members typically start learning about the community?
  • What is the primary web pages and points of contact when new community members get involved?
  • Are there magazines, other websites and other resources that often act as on-ramps for community members to get involved?

Learnability

Items to consider:

  • What documentation/resources are available?
  • What support channels are available to help them learn?

Critically - from the perspective of someone completely new to learning the skills in this area of the community, are our resources easy to follow and understand?

Doability

Items to consider:

  • How does someone know what to work on?
  • How do they contribute their work back?
  • How easy is it for Sam to understand how this works?

New Community Member Feedback

Within this part of the community, look at which community members are new (such as new MOTUs in the Packager assessment or those newly participating in LoCo teams in the Advocacy assessment) and pick five community members to answer the following questions on this page. They should include their answers below.

Name Adnane Belmadiaf (daker)

  • How did you learn about this part of the community?

The first time i found the LoCoDirectory, i have found a bug on it and i was able to fix it, i have started looking for the source and where i could find the developers, and sure LD site was the good place where i have found all the informations that i need to start.

  • What attracted you to this type of participation?

Well, i like The Web and all Internet technologies, developing web applications and website is my daily Job.

  • Where did you look first for information on getting involved?

After finding all the necessary informations, i was able to communicate with the other developers on the IRC channel (#ubuntu-locoteams).

  • Did you feel the places you looked for information were useful? If not, how could we improve?

IRC channels is great thing to get informations quickly and learning how to get start, also the wiki page has a lot of useful tips for new developers.

  • When learning skills and content for participating, were the resources you used useful? If not, how could we improve?

I used IRC channels (#ubuntu-locoteams, #ubuntu-website, #django & #django-fr), the official django docs, blog posts, and the help of other developers and sure they were very useful.

  • What recommendations would you make for improving your experience in our community?

The first important thing to improve my experience is to become an official member, and get involved in other web projects to improve Ubuntu web presence.

Name tdr

  • How did you learn about this part of the community?

I was looking for some way to give back to Ubuntu. I talked to other members of my LoCo asked about Advocacy and what type of events they did. At the time my loco did a drop in centre on the weekends where people could just drop by with ubuntu issues. I did not become involved in advocacy right away it grew over time and a few visits.

  • What attracted you to this type of participation?

I first looked into helping out with the dev of Ubuntu. There were so many web/wiki pages that I just became lost. I did not know where to start. I felt that the barrier to entry was just too high. With Advocacy it started off as an event at a time. First helping out with a little part of an event. Then building up over time to where I now feel confident in running my own advocacy event.

  • Where did you look first for information on getting involved?

I looked closest to home. I read all the information about my Loco. I asked the members of my loco. If there was an upcoming event, I would put myself forward to do a little part of it starting off.

  • Did you feel the places you looked for information were useful? If not, how could we improve? I found IRC meetings great for learning how to help out. I also found the team reports great. It a nice bit of history that one can look over to see how past advocacy events were run. I did not look up general information, I got all mine from my loco.

  • When learning skills and content for participating, were the resources you used useful? If not, how could we improve?

I used the team reports, blog posts, irc meeting of my loco and the members themselves. I cant give any feedback on other resources.

  • What recommendations would you make for improving your experience in our community?

A bit of structure. eg When I first looked in helping out with my loco we did not have monthly IRC meeting. It would be the case that I would go online and there would be noting said for hours. If you have a monthly meeting you know what time and date people will be there and it feels more like a community.

Nigel Babu

  • How did you learn about this part of the community?

Patch Review was somthing we were very bad at doing. It needed somone to get down and dirty and pay some interest. It wasn't a very interesting thing, but something that everyone hated to, but had to be done.

  • What attracted you to this type of participation?

Ubuntu has been heavily critized as not contributing upstream, and this provided a good means to respond to that criticism.

  • Where did you look first for information on getting involved?

I first talked to folks on IRC, the on the wiki pages. I ended up rewriting the wiki pages so others could have a better time helping out.

  • Did you feel the places you looked for information were useful? If not, how could we improve?

I think the wiki wasn't that great, but I rewrote it and not its much better than before

  • When learning skills and content for participating, were the resources you used useful? If not, how could we improve?

The resources that we have are not useful, but the wonderful thing about Ubuntu is it lets us work on improving things for others.

  • What recommendations would you make for improving your experience in our community?

There are some teams that still have difficulty entering for new contributors, that would be a great thing to fix for the future. For example, documentation is what most people who're not contributors would think of when they want to contribute, but somehow I've found the community a bit lacking in how they deal with new contributors.

Matt Daubney (daubers)

  • How did you learn about this part of the community? After joining the Ubuntu-UK Mailing list and starting to participate in the IRC channel it was apparant from the off that there was a consistant theme of "How can we get new users into Linux"

  • What attracted you to this type of participation? The interaction of people who haven't used Linux or Ubuntu before, and how they work when they're on their computer. Workflow of the average human being is quite an interesting thing.

  • Where did you look first for information on getting involved?

The people in the Ubuntu-UK IRC channel were my first port of call

  • Did you feel the places you looked for information were useful? If not, how could we improve?

The places I found useful were LoCo mailing lists (once you're past the bickering) and IRC channels. I've always found wiki's difficult to traverse without some serious thought into what's going on and there can be a lot of "noise" on the Wikis

  • When learning skills and content for participating, were the resources you used useful? If not, how could we improve?

The resources where useful, but finding the correct resource can be an issue. The whole landscape of documentation is very patchy and fragmented, and finding the correct, upto date bit that you're after can be quite challenging. A better collation of resources that's kept upto date and indexed properly would be fantastic.

  • What recommendations would you make for improving your experience in our community?

Generally more face to face things need to happen. While living in front of a screen is fine in some cases, people respond better to a real person in front of them, and this would help prevent a few unnecessary arguments.

Name Charlie Kravetz (charlie-tca)

  • How did you learn about this part of the community?

Since I have vision issues, and lose my vision on a recurring basis, I have always had an interest in Accessibility. When Penelope Stowe announced that the Accessibility Team was being revived, I attended the meeting in April 2010. During that first meeting, I learned that the group would need people speaking out about the ability of all users to use Ubuntu.

  • What attracted you to this type of participation?

I have Multiple Scerosis and Osteoporosis. I lose most of my vision in recurring cycles. I have a difficult time with low contrast and small print. I can not program nor package applications for Ubuntu. When I was told I could help with Accessibility, it seemed like a perfect fit. I find IRC is a great equalizer. We all are equal there, regardless of our ability.

  • Where did you look first for information on getting involved?

Being an avid reader, I follow most things in print. Since so much of the information on the internet is in formats I cannot focus, I tend to look for the actual printed formats to read. I read everything on the Ubuntu wiki when I started using Ubuntu. Nothing looked real promising for someone who could not read online easily, and could not always use both hands like other people.

  • Did you feel the places you looked for information were useful? If not, how could we improve?

The help wiki had a lot of information, but not really so much when it was actually needed. Asking on IRC in the support channels, one quickly learns that usable contrast, high visibility fonts, colors that show up well instead of look good, and basic support are mostly considered as not needed. Even bug triagers will look at usablity for the majority of users as more important than accessibility for all users.

Wiki pages are much more useful for me when I can print them in the same font-size I use to view them. Unfortunately, many times, the font I view them at is much larger than what prints. Also, many times, the pages are formatted using frames, and will not fully print. In those cases, I must copy the text to my own computer, pasting into an editor such as gedit or AbiWord. I can then resize the fonts and print the full text so I can read it.

  • When learning skills and content for participating, were the resources you used useful? If not, how could we improve?

My resources were paying attention to Ubuntu User Days, the wiki, and UDS. Being quite enthusiatic, it seems pretty easy to tell people about Ubuntu and Accessibility. Of course, it helps that I feel so strongly about the subject, too. Having the support of the community really helps.

  • What recommendations would you make for improving your experience in our community?

We need to constantly insure that the wiki pages are usable by everyone, not just the majority of users. We also need to repeat often, using various wordings, since not everyone hears the same thing. We have a huge community already, but there is always room for growth. It takes an average of 17 times for the normal person to remember what they heard. That means if something is said one time, there is an excellent chance it is not remembered. We must always remember we can not force anyone to do what they do not want to. We have to strive instead to educate.

Name (blank of they want to be anonymous)

  • How did you learn about this part of the community?

  • What attracted you to this type of participation?

  • Where did you look first for information on getting involved?

  • Did you feel the places you looked for information were useful? If not, how could we improve?

  • When learning skills and content for participating, were the resources you used useful? If not, how could we improve?

  • What recommendations would you make for improving your experience in our community?

Recommendations For Improvement

The goal of this effort is to make practical changes that improve our community. Please place these recommendations here, and make sure every suggestion is a practical achievable goal.

  • PROBLEM:

  • RECOMMENDED SOLUTION:

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  • RECOMMENDED SOLUTION:

  • PROBLEM:

  • RECOMMENDED SOLUTION:

  • PROBLEM:

  • RECOMMENDED SOLUTION:

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  • RECOMMENDED SOLUTION:

Commentary

This section is for those not involved in the report to leave their feedback.

Good Day Laura,

I put some ideas on the Beginner's Documentation under Commentary. Most comments are relevant to this section as it is of great interest to me. I will not paste the entire text here but refer you to it.

Thank you,

Charlene

CommunityReview/Sep2010/Advocacy (last edited 2010-11-08 23:53:42 by 71-209-63-103)