USSD Tests

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This test case verifies that we can establish a USSD dialogue with a network application. Some operator have menu driven applications that use USSD as bearer. They are invoked with an initial USSD command.  This test case verifies that we can establish a USSD dialogue with a network application. Some operator have menu driven applications that use USSD as bearer. They are invoked with an initial USSD command.

=== Requirements ===
This test case requires an operator that provides some feature that leverages USSD-based menuing.

'''NOTE''' - the major US operators don't support any features requiring USSD menuing, so this feature must be tested with a non-US SIM ( and possibly outside of the US if this test case doesn't work while roaming ).
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- modem-monitor - monitor-ofono
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# We should see in the modem-monitor window something like: # We should see in the monitor-ofono window something like:
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- modem-monitor - monitor-ofono
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# Check that we see a message in modem-monitor of the form # Check that we see a message in monitor-ofono of the form

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1. Send a USSD command with a text reply

Purpose

This test case verifies that we can send simple USSD commands to the network. The commands that we can use depend on the operator. Many operators use USSD commands to retrieve the current line balance, for instance.

Steps

- send-ussd <string>
# This command will return a string with the text returned by the network.

Example strings:
<string> = “*118#” - returns the current time and date (Vodafone, Spain).
<string> = “*3282#” - triggers operator to send data usage report SMS ( AT&T, US )

2. Navigate through a USSD-based menu

Purpose

This test case verifies that we can establish a USSD dialogue with a network application. Some operator have menu driven applications that use USSD as bearer. They are invoked with an initial USSD command.

Requirements

This test case requires an operator that provides some feature that leverages USSD-based menuing.

NOTE - the major US operators don't support any features requiring USSD menuing, so this feature must be tested with a non-US SIM ( and possibly outside of the US if this test case doesn't work while roaming ).

Steps

- monitor-ofono
# The output will show the USSD requests coming from the network
# We open another shell window and send commands from there
- send-ussd <string>
# This command will return a string with the text returned by the network.
# We should see in the monitor-ofono window something like:
{SupplementaryServices} [/ril_0] RequestReceived Choose an option:
1.Top-up
2.Check balance
0.Exit

# We choose one menu option
- send-ussd “2”

# After this, we can have more menus, or the operator will do an
action like sending an SMS,  the network will set the USSD state
to idle stopping the dialogue, etc. The send-ussd script will wait
for input from the user whenever it receives a new network initiated
USSD request.

Example strings:
<string> = "*255#". Menu for managing gift vouchers (Vodafone, Spain).
<string> = "*123#". Menu for buying credit (pay as you go cards, Vodafone, Spain).

3. Receive a USSD notification

Purpose

This test case verifies that we can receive USSD notification from the network. Some operators use them to send, for instance, a notification with the remaining balance after sending an SMS or finishing a voice call.

Steps

- monitor-ofono
# Open another shell
- dial-number A
# Get the call in A
- hangup-all
# Check that we see a message in monitor-ofono of the form
{SupplementaryServices} [/ril_0] NotificationReceived <string>

Process/Merges/TestPlans/ofono/USSD Tests (last edited 2015-09-17 14:20:08 by alfonsosanchezbeato)