rc-iso-testing-qa

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Ubuntu Precise Pangolin Release Candidate - ISO Testing Tutorial - QA Testing

Introduction

You have chosen the "QA Testing" alternative to test Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (12.04) Release Candidate. If this is not right, click here to return to the previous page.

In this section you will learn how to:

  • Access the Ubuntu QA Team ISO Tracker
  • Select ISO images, download and install them
  • Perform Test-Cases

  • Report results

Step 1: Create a Launchpad account

If you don't have a Launchpad Account, click here to create one.

Step 2: Hardware Profile

When we run the SYSTEM TESTING utility or any of the other Checkbox type testing suites as hardware profile is generated at the end of the test. A copy of it is stored in our Launchpad account.

Log in to your Launchpad account and add this line to the url of your page and press enter.

/+hwdb-submissions

The page that you go to will list all the hardware profiles that have been generated when you ran the System Testing and Checkbox test suites.

Use that same page url when reporting test results to QA. So, copy that url into a text document where is can be handily retrieved when reporting your results.

When we run a test case we can report to the QA team that the result was either a PASS or a FAIL.

  • To Report a PASS result to QA we need:
    • A Single Sign On identification.
    • A hardware profile.
  • To report a FAIL result to QA we need:
    • A Single Sign On identity.
    • A hardware profile.
    • A number for the bug or bugs that caused the test case to fail.

SINGLE SIGN ON IDENTIFICATION

We get a SSO ID when we register at Launchpad. The email address and the password that we gave when registering at Launchpad are used by the Single Sign ON process to uniquely identify us.

Step 3: Login and use the QA ISO Tracker

  • Access the QA ISO Tracker here and use your Launchpad account and password to login.

  • Click on Precise RC to select the RC area of the tracker.

    • It should be noted that as of 0100 UTC April 10th there is not as link to the Milestone Release Candidate ISO. We will have to use the link to Milestone Precise Daily. Whether this will change during the testing period, I cannot say.
  • Click on the Ubuntu product you will download and test (example: Ubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Studio, Mythbuntu, etc).
    • Note the version number of the ISO image that you will be downloading. You will need it when reporting your results to the QA team.
  • A list of "test cases" for the selected product will be displayed.
  • Select a test-case and the tracker will show you a Link to the download information and a link to the test-case description.

Step 4: Small FAQ

What is an ISO?

The ISO is an "image" file. It can be burned to a CD, DVD or USB portable drive (like a pen drive, USB Stick, etc).

Where are the ISOs?

  • When you select an Ubuntu product inside the QA ISO Tracker, you will see a Link to download information.

  • Click on this link to see download options you can use.

What are "Standard" and "Alternate" ISOs?

  • "Standard" ISOs will use a graphical user interface (GUI) when installing and install a standard Ubuntu desktop operating system.
  • "Alternate" ISOs use a different installer and allow for some different install tasks, such as installing to systems with very low ram (less than 384MB, implementing RAID and LVM, among other.

  • This tutorial is about QA testing of ISO images so we should download the ISO from QA ISO Testing Tracker page. These ISO images come with an identification code based upon the date - for example 20120421. The ISO image available on the 2012/04/21 and which is being tested during that 24 hour period and against which we test.

Should I pick the "standard" or the "alternate"?

  • If you know and use the features mentioned in the previous topic (RAID, LVM) or have previously used the Alternate ISO to overcome some particular issue in your setup, choose the Alternate ISO.

  • If you don't use or are not familiar with the features mentioned and have never needed to use the alternate ISO, choose the Standard ISO.

  • Despite that, if you are more confident in trying something new, you are encouraged to try the alternate ISO if your test-case requires that, even if you haven't ever used it.

Which ISO "architecture" should I download?

Your system can probably run a 64-Bit version of Ubuntu if you have a modern computer. If you are not sure, just download the 32-Bit version.

Where are the ISOs?

As you click on Link to the download information, you'll be presented with some options for downloading the ISO.

Step 5: Downloading Ubuntu Precise Pangolin (12.04) RC ISO

There are many possible ways to get it. It's just an ordinary download from the web. Let's explore two main methods of download:

  • Browser: Simply point your browser to the ISO download site (QA download page) and download the desired ISO to any folder in your current operating system. ~/Downloads is a good choice. If you are using Windows or other operating system, save the file to the usual download location.

  • ZSync: ZSync allows you to quickly update a local ISO file to a version that is available Online. We use it to keep up with daily changes (and not have to re-download the entire ISO everyday). But it's smart to use it even if you don't have an outdated ISO because ZSync can continue a download from where it stopped (in case you loose your Internet connection during the download). ZSync will only be available if you're using Ubuntu (or other Linux distribution).


Example 1: Downloading Ubuntu Precise Pangolin RC 64-Bit standard ISO to your Downloads folder with ZSync:

  • 1.Click on the Dash
    2.Open a Gnome-Terminal
    3.Type in (or paste) the following into the Gnome-Terminal window:

Tip: To paste into the terminal, use the keys Ctrl+Shift+V or right click anywhere inside the terminal and select "Paste"

   1 cd Downloads
   2 zsync -i <name of your current .iso here> http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/daily-live/current/precise-desktop-amd64.iso.zsync 


Example 2: Downloading Ubuntu Precise Pangolin RC 32-Bit standard ISO to your Downloads folder with ZSync:

  • 1.Click on the Dash
    2.Open a Gnome-Terminal
    3.Type in (or paste) the following into the Gnome-Terminal window:

Tip: To paste into the terminal, use the keys Ctrl+Shift+V or right click anywhere inside the terminal and select "Paste"

   1 cd Downloads
   2 zsync -i <name of you current .iso here> http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/daily-live/current/precise-desktop-i386.iso.zsync 


ZSync will show the download status and completion percentage on the terminal. It will exit when it reaches 100%. After that, if you browse to your Downloads folder, you'll see the ISO there.

ZSync: Command not found
If you see this message, it means you don't have ZSync installed in your system. Don't worry, it's a very small and fast download. Just type in (or paste) the following into the Gnome-Terminal window:
Tip: To paste into the terminal, use the keys Ctrl+Shift+V or right click anywhere inside the terminal and select "Paste"

   1 sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install zsync 


Enter your password in Gnome-Terminal and wait a few seconds for the installation to finish. Now use one of the two examples above to download a 32-Bit or 64-Bit Ubuntu ISO using your recently installed ZSync.

Step 6: Check your Test-Case!

  • Your test case may ask you to install from a CD-ROM/DVD-ROM, from a USB Stick, from Ubuntu, from Windows, using a graphical or console installer.
  • Verify the appropriate media and proceed to the adequate section in the next step.
  • Some test cases apply to a range of ISO images. This breakdown will give you more information about test cases Test case breakdown.

Step 7: Burning the ISO

Burning the ISO to a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM

From Ubuntu

  • 1.Right-click on the downloaded ISO file. A context-menu should appear.
    2.In this context-menu, you should see either a default or a 3rd part application option to burn the ISO to a CD-ROM/DVD-ROM
    3.It's a fairly simple process, but if you need detailed instructions, read them here.

From Windows

  • 1.Right-click on the downloaded ISO file. A context-menu should appear.
    2.In this context-menu, you should see either a default or a 3rd part windows program option to burn the ISO to a CD-ROM/DVD-ROM
    3.If you don't have this option as a default on Windows and also don't have a 3rd part application to burn CD-ROM/DVD-ROM installed, download and install InfraRecorder. It's a simple application, but if you need instructions, read them here.

Burning the ISO to a USB Removable Drive

From Ubuntu

  • 1.Click on the Dash and open Startup Disk Creator'
    2.Click on "Other" and select the Ubuntu ISO you have downloaded previously.
    3.Select your PenDrive and create your Ubuntu ISO USB stick

From Windows

  1. Insert a USB stick with at least 2GB in your PC.

  2. Download and install PenDrive Linux

  3. Run the program. On "Step 1", select "Local ISO". On "Step 2", select the Ubuntu ISO you have downloaded previously. On "Step 3", select your PenDrive unit and click on "Create". Your ISO will be recorded to the PenDrive.

Mounting the ISO to a Virtual Machine Hard Disk or virtual CD-ROM drive

If your test case allows for this possibility, consider using VirtualBox as the virtualization software. If you already have vmware-player or other virtualization software installed and know how to use it, presumably you don't need help mounting the Ubuntu ISO as one of it's virtual drives. If that is the case, please proceed directly to Step 3 (Installing the Ubuntu ISO).

  • If you have VirtualBox installed and know how to mount Ubuntu ISO on it, proceed directly to the next step in this tutorial.

  • If you would like to read instructions on how to install VirtualBox and mount Ubuntu ISO as one of its virtual drives, please click here.

Step 8: Check your Test-Case (Yes. Again!)

  • Your test-case will describe what exactly you are supposed to do and how you should install the previously burned ISO CD/DVD or USB (or a previously setup Virtual Machine).
  • Some test cases apply to a range of ISO images. This breakdown will give you more information about test cases Test case breakdown.

Step 9: Installing Ubuntu RC

This sections provides some help on the most common ways to install Ubuntu. Please refer to your test-case and choose the most appropriate method.

From Ubuntu

"Graphical" Install (Ubiquity)

  1. Simply insert your recently burned CD-ROM/DVD-ROM or USB Stick and you should automatically see the installer in a few moments

  2. At this point you are already testing.

  3. Remember to take notes of any interesting error, bug, misbehavior you see.

Console (text-mode, "Non-graphical") Install

  1. Simply insert your recently burned CD-ROM/DVD-ROM or USB Stick to your PC and restart it.

  2. If your PC still boots from the hard disk, loading your previous Ubuntu (or other operating system) and not the RC, it means you have to instruct it to boot from the CD-ROM/DVD-ROM drive or USB unit. If that is the case, restart the PC and, during POST (the usually black screen that appears right after you power on the PC), try to read what Key should be pressed to select the boot order or boot device. If this option is not present directly, you should press the key to enter the PC BIOS Setup. You can get detailed instruction on setting up the PC to boot from a CD/DVD here and, for booting from USB, check here.

  3. At this point you are already testing.

  4. Remember to take notes of any interesting error, bug, misbehavior you see.

From Windows

"Graphical" Install (Wubi)

  1. Simply insert your recently burned CD-ROM/DVD-ROM or USB Stick and you will be prompted by Windows to execute it.

  2. At this point you are already testing.

  3. Remember to take notes of any interesting error, bug, misbehavior you see.

Console (text-mode, "Non-graphical") Install

  1. Simply insert your recently burned CD-ROM/DVD-ROM or USB Stick to your PC and restart it.

  2. If your PC still boots from the hard disk, loading your previous Ubuntu (or other operating system) and not the RC, it means you have to instruct it to boot from the CD-ROM/DVD-ROM drive or USB unit. If that is the case, restart the PC and, during POST (the usually black screen that appears right after you power on the PC), try to read what Key should be pressed to select the boot order or boot device. If this option is not present directly, you should press the key to enter the PC BIOS Setup. You can get detailed instruction on setting up the PC to boot from a CD/DVD here and, for booting from USB, check here.

  3. At this point you are already testing.

  4. Remember to take notes of any interesting error, bug, misbehavior you see.

On a VirtualBox Virtual Machine (Windows or Ubuntu "Host")

Follow the step by step procedures outlined here.

Step 10:Reporting Bugs

  1. The first thing to do is create a new Launchpad account if you don't already have one.

  2. By the end of the test-case you will have a link for reporting any bug you eventually find.

  3. If you are unsure or don't know exactly how to explain the bug, consider reading the procedures outlined here or ask for support at the UbuntuForums.

Step 11: Reporting to the Quality Assurance (QA) Team

When we run a test case we can report to the QA team that the result was either a PASS or a FAIL.

A reminder.

  • To report a PASS result to QA we need:
    • a) A Single Sign On identification.
    • b) A hardware profile.
  • To report a FAIL result to QA we need:
    • a) A Single Sign On identity.
    • b) A hardware profile.
    • c) A number for the bug or bugs that caused the test case to fail.

Here is what we do.

  • Go return to iso.qa.ubuntu.com and log in using your Single Sign On.
  • Select the Milestone ISO group that is being tested and then select ISO image that you downloaded. Make sure that you are reporting on the same version that you downloaded. ISO images version numbers are changed daily.
    • Example: Ubuntu Desktop amd64 version number 20120409.
  • Click on the test case that you ran.
    • Example: Live Session.

You will now be at the Add Result page where you can mark the test case as Failed (default), Passed, or In progress. Add your hardware profile url.

If you are reporting a test case that failed add the bug number that caused the failure in the section marked Critical Bugs. If there is more than one bug, then separate the numbers with a comma ( , ) and nothing else. There is also a section for recording the bug number of bugs found during the test. In the comments box record the test case during which the bug was detected. In our example of the Live session there are three test cases. Make any other comments that you wish. And then click Submit Result. We can edit the results that we have submitted and even delete them if we have made a mistake.

Breakdown of Test Cases

Here you will find an incomplete breakdown of QA ISO image testing test cases. Test case breakdown

U+1/DeployedProjects/rc-iso-testing-qa (last edited 2012-04-24 12:39:43 by lucking)