BugStates

This page aims to describe how the Kernel team uses bug states, why a bug should be in a specific state, and what actions need to be taken in each.

New Bugs

Bugs should always come in with a Status of New and an Importance of Undecided. Bugs should automatically have the appropriate debug information attached assuming they were reported using the preferred ubuntu-bug linux method. If this is the case, move the bug to a Confirmed state. If the bug is missing the appropriate debug information, the submitter should be asked to run apport-collect. Note the apport-collect command below only applies to Karmic.

apport-collect -p linux <bug#>

In Jaunty, use

apport-collect -p linux-image-`uname -r` <bug #>

Set the bug to Incomplete. Also tag the bug "needs-kernel-logs". It's also a good idea to subscribe to a bug which you've set to Incomplete. That will ensure you are notified if and when the requested information is provided.

See process-new-bugs.py Kernel Arsenal script [to be linked soon]

Incomplete Bugs

Bugs are typically moved from a New state to an Incomplete state because they are lacking debug information necessary for the Ubuntu Kernel Team to debug the issue. Once all the information has been provided, the bug should be moved from an Incomplete state to a Confirmed state. If the bug was previously tagged "needs-kernel-logs", remove the tag as well once the bug moves to a Confirmed state.

If a bug is in an Incomplete state for more than 120 days and is not updated to provide the requested information, the bug should be expired by setting the status to Invalid and the reason it's being expired should be stated as a comment.

See process-incomplete-bugs.py Kernel Arsenal script [to be linked soon]

Confirmed Bugs

Confirmed bugs should have the appropriate debug information attached. In order for a Confirmed bug to move to a Triaged state, the upstream mainline kernel should be tested as well. This not only helps determine if the bug exists upstream, but also helps determine if a bug might be fixed upstream as well. If the bug exists upstream is also allow additional upstream developers to examine the issue. As mentioned previously, the Ubuntu kernel team will be focusing on bugs which have been confirmed to exist upstream or are fixed upstream but exist in the Ubuntu kernel. If a bug is in a Confirmed state but has not yet tested the upstream mainline kernel, tag the bug "needs-upstream-testing". If a bug has been tested with the upstream kernel, move the bug to a "Triaged" state. If the bug was previously tagged with "needs-upstream-testing", remove the tag once the bug moves to a Triaged state.

See process-confirmed-bugs.py Kernel Arsenal script [to be linked soon]

Triaged Bugs

Once a bug has been tested with the upstream mainline kernel and moved to a Triaged state, the bug should have their Importance set to something other than Undecided. If a bug is Triaged, then there should be enough information to know how important it is. If a bug was tested with the upstream mainline kernel and determined to exist upstream, a bug should also be reported upstream and an upstream bug watch should be set.

Note, you must be a member of the Ubuntu Bug Control team in order to set bugs to Triaged.

In Progress

A bug will move from Triaged to In Progress when a developer has chosen to actively work on the bug. If you are a developer and have set a bug to In Progress, make sure you also assign the bug to yourself. Please keep in mind that a bug marked In Progress for an extended period (greater than a week or two) should be updated periodically with any progress. If you are unable to dedicate time to working on the bug, move the bug back to a Triaged state and unassign yourself from the bug.

Also, do not assign another individual to a bug without their consent first! Doing so just gives bug reporters/subscribers a false sense that someone is actively working on a bug when that may not be the case. Leave it to the discretion of the developer to take ownership of a bug.

Fix Committed

Bugs that are marked Fix Committed are considered fixed by a patch which as been committed to the Ubuntu kernel git repository. This does not mean the fix has been released but it should be expected to be in the next kernel upload. There is no determinate time when a kernel upload will happen, it's up to the discretion of the Ubuntu Kernel Team.

Fix Released

Bugs are moved to a Fix Released state when the fix is readily available in the Ubuntu archive (in the updates pocket). If the Ubuntu kernel developer correctly created the git commit message to include the Launchpad Buglink, the launchpad janitor should automatically move a bug from Fix Committed to Fix Released once the fix is officially available.

Won't Fix

Won't Fix indicates the issue is recognized as a bug but a fix will not be applied, for ex BIOS issues. Some bugs may be marked as Won't Fix for a specific release and Fix Released against another.

Note, you must be a member of the Ubuntu Bug Control team in order to set bugs to Won't Fix.

Invalid

Bugs which are not legitimate bugs are set to Invalid. This can include bugs which failed to provide requested debug information or bugs which are the result of user error.


CategoryKernel CategoryBugSquad

Kernel/BugTriage/BugStates (last edited 2011-02-17 22:19:34 by ris)